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students at ucla with large preferences who have a 90% chance of congratulating the only 50% chance of passing the bar. welcome. so that i cumulatively meant that only 45% of the students with large preferences that were admitting went on to go through law school and get their degrees. it wasn't hard to look at the schools and los angeles where the students with preferences would have gotten in without preference to see that those students seemed to have much better outcomes so i started looking into this and looked for the databases that could help test it, and by 2004, 2005, developed the paper that we first discussed this in the context and found that this was quite a large problem that nationally the great bulk of the minority students especially african-american students were not receiving very large preference is typically on a scale of a couple hundred s.a.t. points or ten to 15 that the traits were generally very poor for this group only about one-third starting infil law school in early 2000 were graduating and passing the bar on their first attempt. this was affecting the
fewer african-americans at berkeley and ucla. when racial preferences were admitted -- this was not actually about outcome. those students who had been admitted to berkeley and ucla were going to school and had higher success rates and because berkeley and ucla afforded so many minority students with a national reputation to do so the race neutrality increased the integration across campuses. one of the things we talk about in the book is the cascade effect. when elite universities admit students, a four paid graphic in the book illustrates this. have the first pick and the students there would like to admit through preference. so they admit not only the very top african-american, hispanic, they also admit those in second, third and fourth tiers of academic achievement. that means when the second tier schools use preferences they start far down the ladder. ironically that means the largest preferences are not used by the most elite schools but schools that are in the third or fourth tier of all colleges. this is important for couple reasons. when is it helps explain
intelligent and articulate. he went to ucla. he ended up going to do ucla. >> you are on the campus of usc. >> we won't get excited about that. so much of what he did with his life was an example. after his sports career, he became a businessman. a very successful businessman. he pointed out things and with regard to economics that black americans needed to know about. he was very -- very much a wall model and mentor in many of the aspects of his life. >> that's call from our viewing audience is lisa in nashville. caller: thank you for taking my call. i love c-span 2 and "book tv." mr. kareem abdul-jabbar, it is such an honor to talk you into here about the book you have written. i knew you were an author, but i did not realize how many books you have written. what was the title of your first book and how do you decide on the subjects of iraq's? >> the title of my first book was a giant steps. it is my biography. i'm a pretty tall person, i take long steps. that's how i got the title of my book. but i choose my subject matter with regards to how to impact people and explain things about am
to ucla. he ended up going to do ucla. >> you are on the campus of usc. >> we won't get excited about that. so much of what he did with his life was an example. after his sports career, he became a businessman. a very successful businessman. he pointed out things and with regard to economics that black americans needed to know about. he was very -- very much a wall model and mentor in many of the aspects of his life. >> that's call from our viewing audience is lisa in nashville. caller: thank you for taking my call. i love c-span 2 and "book tv." mr. kareem abdul-jabbar, it is such an honor to talk you into here about the book you have written. i knew you were an author, but i did not realize how many books you have written. what was the title of your first book and how do you decide on the subjects of iraq's? >> the title of my first book was a giant steps. it is my biography. i'm a pretty tall person, i take long steps. that's how i got the title of my book. but i choose my subject matter with regards to how to impact people and explain things about american life that a lot of people are
competitive institution like stanford is not surprising as the receipt of uc-berkeley, ucla are having a harder time achieving racial and ethnic diversity than some of these other institutions would still not end to the same extent drawn national poll. what about graduates jack ray sanders is here from ucla law school and all your little bit from the program that he said the letter. ucla has of strong program of providing a leggett to economically disadvantaged students. you can see in the data that if you look at african-american students 22 of 63 under the socio-economic program, the economic disadvantage to students. compared to only 12 out of 382 who were admitted through other programs. that is to say, more african-american students were admitted through the socio-economic program than the regular program even though the socio-economic program a much smaller. overall, if you look at the results that ucla law school, 56 percent of the students admitted through socioeconomic affirmative action or black or hispanic compared to just 6 percent of those not admitted through those progra
academic colleagues at ucla where i've been getting a phd. for the first one i'd like to make, one thing that sets the tea party apart from many others if they have a very traditional review. so essentially, they have this view america's land of opportunity and that all people regardless of backgrounds can succeed. now this is not to say, but they have this even more so and this is how the answer poll questions and how they help explain a lot of there there policy positions that other people have a hard time understanding. the scope of this. so these are some signs i took at a washington d.c. tea party protest here by the capital. you often see signs like this. don't spread my wealth. spread my work ethic. stop punishing and rewarding failure. this is all part of a common thing. and for this to make sense, i think we should go for some polling data. i'm going to show you some polling numbers that i've conducted with the recent rupaul that i directed the foundation. why actually had an opportunity to ask americans in general, but also tea partiers about how they perceive the fairness abou
promise to come back as a doctor and put their health come i went to ucla and then to harvard medical school where became the first latino to receive three graduate degrees from harvard. true to my promise, i came home as an er doctor at eisenhower medical center. i am living proof that the american dream. but for too many people, the american dream is endangered because washington is broken. too many workers have lost their jobs. too many retirees have lost their saving and too many students can't afford college. and congress and our congress on have lost touch with the people. instead of looking out for us, they are focused on partisan bickering, scoring political points of looking out for themselves and wealthy donors. congresswoman bono mack's response is more at the same. more bickering, more partisanship. and were looking out for yourself instead of us. instead of listening to people in proposing world solution, the congresswoman replies on the same partisan playbook that does nothing to create jobs or fixed income. watch tonight how many times you pass around empty phrases like
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7